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Osiligi Maasai Warrior Dance Troupe
Blair Drummond Safari Park, just outside Stirling, was the venue for the Osiligi Maasai Warrior Dance Troupe
during part of the Scottish section of their 2008 tour of the UK.
VIDEOS Saturday 21 June 2008

1 Called to join the celebration
2 Women sing to God
3 Jumping spectators
4 Celebrating God and theatre
5 Emmanuel speaks about the Maasai people

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The Maasai are called to join the celebration by the sounding of a horn

  

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4 minutes

This was not their first tour and hopefully it will not be their last.
The Maasai people live in southern Kenya and northern Tanzania in east Africa. They must have felt quite at home among the lions, giraffes, elephants and zebras of Blair Drummond Safari Park.

The Safari Park is one of Scotland’s main attractions though it closes during the winter. They have expanded the site to include a fun fare and children’s adventure play area and much more.
About a 6 minute drive from Stirling town centre and less than an hour's drive from Glasgow or Edinburgh, Blair Drummond is on the A84 road to Callander and the Trossachs.

If you are planning a trip, you should get their early as there are a lot of things to see and do.
You can check out their website at Blair Drummond Safari Park

 

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Maasai women sing to God to give them children

 

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2 minutes

The lives of the troupe and their families are tough. They graze their cattle and goats in areas of extreme drought. Fresh water is scarce. Infant mortality is high.

Education is basic and overcrowded.
However, the financial benefits of the tour have greatly improved the lives of the troupe in their home village.
John Curtin (tour organiser

 

 

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Maasai Warriors can jump high – so can the spectators

 

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6 minutes

Hitherto the Maasai have always been wandering nomads. When the grass on which their cattle were feeding ran out they moved on. Now however the Government have put a stop to that way of life. Each member of the Troupe has been given a plot of land on which they must settle.

For the first time ever, they will put down roots. Hence they now seek to develop methods of cultivation, improvements in animal husbandry, and in the education of their children especially girls.
John Curtin (tour organiser

 

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Maasai dance and sing of God and theatre

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7 minutes

Without any formal education, they have thrown themselves into their efforts and have become stunning performers.

Everyone who comes to see them is mesmerised, excited yet humbled by their performance. They are so proud yet always the humility shines through. They are always laughing and singing, stress doesn't exist in their life. During the tours they are together 24/7. Yet in all those months they have never had a cross word. We have much to learn from them.
John Curtin (tour organiser

 

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Emmanuel speaks about the Maasai people

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5 minutes

Sorry about the poor audio quality — I have a better microphone now.

There are details of the 2008 tour, the performers and their village on a document currently (October 2008) available on the Blair Drummond Safari Park website. I have taken the liberty of copying it to this website.
Read about the Troupe members

you can keep up to date with future venues hosting the Osiligi Maasai Warrior Dance Troupe
by visiting their official UK web site http://www.osiligiwarriors.co.uk/

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